My Blog Is Dead...But It's Ok

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Content

1.) My Blog Is Dead...But It's Ok

2.) Tracks

3.) Important Wax

4.) Music Video Of The Week



MY BLOG IS DEAD...BUT IT'S OK

Nearly seven years ago, I started this small music blog with my best friend Hank.  I had thought about starting a music blog for years because I looked up to the likes of My Old Kentucky Blog, You Ain't No Picasso, Aquarium Drunkard, I Guess I'm Floating, and many more.  I couldn't understand how these gatekeepers of music knew so many bands/artists I've never heard of before.  I wanted to be like them and, more importantly, wanted to help discover those unknown bands/artists and help talented people become known.

Over seven years, We Listen For You has had its ups and downs.  In 2010 we were named by our peers the #1 music blog in a friendly, blog-only voting poll and were seeing our largest traffic year to date.  What I want readers to understand is that all over the world, there are people like us at We Listen For You examining tracks, albums, videos, etc for no money and taking up tons of the little free time we have.  It's a weird obsession that slowly becomes part of your identity.  Over these seven years, I've tried to shut down the site here and there (maybe three times a year), but I just can't imagine not having this outlet.  

These days, it feels like our music blog and many other music blogs are losing interest in moving forward. We've seen our audience shrink, mostly due to our own irregular posting (or the lack thereof).  My biggest sadness in this comes in the form of musical discovery.  It seems every year it gets harder and harder to convince readers to check out bands/artists they aren't already familiar with.  This is where I make a request to you, the individual reading this right now.  I'm pleading with you to give us a chance... once a day... and give the same chance to the smaller artists we highlight as you give the ones you already know.  You will not like everything we write about. Still, music bloggers all over who are writing about the little guy, the band struggling to get the smallest amount of attention... we're all pouring or hearts and time into this and it means nothing if you don't have the thirst to discover what's new.  The ultimate joke is that in the music industry today, even the bigger bands need help.

So... where does WLFY go next?  You might remember a few years ago we made a promise to cut all the fat... no music gossip, news, or irrelevant lists... just keep our modest music blog focused on the nuts and bolts: music analysis and discovery.  As I get older, it becomes harder and harder to post five times a day and turn pieces around before they become irrelevant to the reader.

Knowing this, I introduce you to the new WLFY format:

Every Tuesday, I will create a post like this with chapters.  Each one will highlight tracks, vinyl, and most of all, my personal thoughts on any and all topics relating to music.  A lot of the time, the title to these posts won't be sexy or have you itching to click... but please, give us your time for just a few minutes each day.  Hank and the rest of the staff will each have their own regular posting day.  We hope over time you get to know each of us personally through our weekly posts and at the same time, hope to open up a steady conversation with you, the regular reader.  Mondays will be open for larger, standalone writing like full album reviews, think pieces, and other features if a writer feels inclined to do so.

Thanks for reading.  WLFY might be practically dead, but I'll never be able to let it go.

TRACKS

Roman Ruins - "Loved One"

The music of Graham Hill (Roman Ruins) always focuses on perfect order and layering.  I've mentioned it before, but Hill's background as an architect seems to inform his style of music.  His tracks build themselves in front of the listener.  What starts as a blueprint introduces us to the individual components -- by the the end, we're settled on a wide shot of the finished creation.  The music of Roman Ruins builds complete structures over the time of the track, while simultaneously stepping back to show what the synchronicity of several concepts can ultimately create.



Bear In Heaven - "Autumn"

I always refer to the music of Bear In Heaven as "danceable reflection in slow motion."  The music drives forward in a systematic form that makes one want to dance, but there are also layers of dark emotion that make the listener want to reflect, elevating each track to much more than just a good time.  The music beats heavy and cycles upon itself, a gentle tornado of synths and bold vocals that makes the world seem larger and more important, every sound creating a visceral reaction and causing mandatory reflection note after note.



James Bay - "If You Ever Want To Be In Love"

The blending of several genres of music fits this James Bay track very well.  It has a bit of twang on the guitars and is complimented by booming vocals that drive the song forward.  "If You Ever Want To Be In Love" is all about being smooth, from its great production to its emotive vocals.  This is a perfect summer song that pulls all the right strings to put the listener in that special mental space that ballads tend to do.  There is a lovely drop out with a gentle piano at the end which clearly marks Bay as a clever musician in full control of his craft.




IMPORTANT WAX


If you hang around vinyl obsessed people long enough, the debate about missing songs/albums never pressed on wax begins like clockwork.  This is one of my favorite songs of all time and until recently was never available on vinyl format:

This problem was recently fixed by the Numero Group record label, who released what has to be my favorite "reissue special release" on vinyl this year.  It sports a beautiful gatefold packaging with twenty-four perfect tracks.  The release includes the one and only original Sandy Denny & The Srawbs album that has always been hard to find on wax, along with a ton of b-sides that never saw the light of day.  The most impressive quality of this release is how every single b-side is of top quality and makes you question why anything was ever cut.  This is a must own album -- maybe I'll buy two because my first copy has been glued to the turntable and I don't think it will be leaving its spot anytime soon.
PURCHASE / LEARN MORE
MUSIC VIDEO OF THE WEEK

4 comments:

  1. I was a bit panicked by the title! Too many great blogs have shuttered in the last year alone. I'm happy to see WLFY continue in any capacity that continues to be meaningful for its writers and readers. Keep it up.

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  2. Fantastic piece here - just stumbled across you guys and am looking forward to future posts. I've been starting my own blog and have run into the same problems in my first year. Glad to see others are encountering the "little man exposure" problem as well.

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  3. Thank you so much even though you don't post much I still check this blog everyday because I want to discover and help spread the word about the little artist out here. So thank you I never left and never will. I have learned so much from this blog.

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  4. I have read your blog which is totally correct and informative :-)


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